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Opinion

Workers make the profit, workers get the profit

There’s no inherent right to profit if you start the business, particularly if you perform only a fraction of the labour.

One common reason I see people use to justify billionaires getting to keep a company’s profits is that they invested time and money into starting the company.

However, if investing time and money into a company is what entitles one to the surplus labour value, then all the more reason that workers should get more of the revenue their labour generates.

McDonald’s isn’t a global corporation because Ray Kroc flipped 300 billion burgers all by himself.

Sales for Amazon’s paid units weren’t up 46% last quarter over the previous year because Jeff Bezos himself is managing the website and fulfilling every order.

Walmart isn’t the largest company in the world with half a trillion in revenue because Sam Walton stocks the shelves in every store and checks out every purchase.

Bill Gates isn’t worth over $130 billion because he personally coded every piece of software Microsoft ever sold.

The Weston family isn’t worth $10 billion because George and his descendents personally baked every loaf of bread, unloaded every truck, rang through every shopper’s groceries.

The Thomson family’s net worth isn’t $40 billion because they all wrote every news story their companies published.

There’s no inherent right to profit if you start the business, particularly if you perform only a fraction of the labour.

Workers make the profit; workers get the profit.

By Kim Siever

I live in Lethbridge with my spouse and 4 of our 6 children. I’m a writer, focusing on political news, social issues, and the occasional poem. My politics are radically left.

I’m also dichotomally Mormon. And I’m a functional vegetarian: I have a blog post about that somewhere around here. My pronouns are he/him, and I’m queer.

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