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COVID-19 more likely to affect marginalized communities in Canada

Last week, Innovative Research Group published the results of a recent study they conducted into how COVID-19 has affected marginalized populations in Canada.

Last week, Innovative Research Group published the results of a recent study they conducted into how COVID-19 has affected marginalized populations in Canada.

In partnership with Egale and the African-Canadian Civic Engagement Council, the survey collected the response of 2,322 people living in Canada.

Here are some of the findings from the study.

2SLGBTQ+ respondents were also more likely (29%) to indicate that they were Black, Indigenous, or a person of colour (BIPOC) than the general population (20%).

Employment

Respondents who belonged to the 2SLGBTQ+ community (referred to as LGBTQI2S in the report) were more likely to be unemployed than the general population, as well as more likely to be a student, more likely to be working part-time (if working), and more likely to have been laid off because of COVID-19.

When they are working, 2SLGBTQ+ respondents were more likely than the general population to be doing so in the following sectors:

  • Health care
  • Retail
  • Education
  • Government and public administration
  • Hospitality and tourism
  • Arts and entertainment
  • Not-for-profit
  • Consumer packaged goods

2SLGBTQ+ respondents were more likely (55% and 58%) than the general public (49%) to work in an environment where they must interact with other face-to-face often or even all the time.

Both 2SLGBTQ+ groups were more likely to have been laid off or had their work hours reduced than those of the general population

General2SLGBTQ+BIPOC
2SLGBTQ+
Laid off13%19%21%
Reduced hours12%13%9%
Combined25%32%30%

They’re also more likely to commute to work using forms of transportation that require public interaction.

General2SLGBTQ+BIPOC
2SLGBTQ+
Own vehicle75%60%50%
Public transit12%18%23%
Walking/cycling8%11%4%
Carpooling5%9%24%

Plus, they typically feel less safe (18% and 23%) than the general population (12%) during that commute.

Health

Respondents from the 2SLGBTQ+ community were more likely to have general health challenges than the general population, and this was even more pronounced if they were also part of the BIPOC community.

General2SLGBTQ+BIPOC
2SLGBTQ+
Physical disability14%20%36%
Mental disability10%25%35%
Respiratory issues21%28%40%

Both BIPOC 2SLGBTQ+ and non-BIPOC 2SLGBTQ+ respondents responded with poorer physical health and mental health, as well as higher stress levels than the general population did:

General2SLGBTQ+BIPOC
2SLGBTQ+
Fair/poor physical health17%33%39%
Fair/poor mental health21%41%38%
High stress levels24%37%41%

According to the poll results, both 2SLGBTQ+ groups seemed slightly less confident (17% and 18%) in being able to access necessary health care than the general population (11%).

They’re also less likely (14% and 17%) than the general population (9%) to be satisfied with their lives at the moment.

COVID-19

BIPOC 2SLGBTQ+ respondents were more likely (21%) than the other two groups (both 9%) to have been admitted to the hospital for a confirmed or suspected case of COVID-19.

Finally, 2SLGBTQ+ respondents were more likely than the general population to report COVID-19 significantly impacting their physical health, mental health, finances, and quality of life, more so if they were Black, Indigenous, or persons of colour.

General2SLGBTQ+BIPOC
2SLGBTQ+
Physical health17%25%33%
Mental health25%47%47%
Household finances25%27%32%
Quality of life29%37%42%

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By Kim Siever

I live in Lethbridge with my spouse and 5 of our 6 children. I’m a writer, focusing on political news, social issues, and the occasional poem. My politics are radically left. I recently finished writing a book debunking several capitalism myths. My newest book writing project is on the labour history of Lethbridge.

I’m also dichotomally Mormon. And I’m a functional vegetarian: I have a blog post about that somewhere around here. My pronouns are he/him, and I’m queer.

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