Categories
Lethbridge

I’m writing a book on Lethbridge’s labour history

So, a few weeks ago, I wrote a post about the labour history in Lethbridge. I discovered that historical information about labour in Lethbridge is not readily accessible. I intend to change that.

So, a few weeks ago, I wrote a post about the labour history in Lethbridge. I discovered that historical information about labour in Lethbridge is not readily accessible. I intend to change that.

I’m writing a book.

Since last week, I have been compiling a list of potential sources for information about labour in Lethbridge, and I’m convinced that there is enough data out there to warrant writing a book.

I’m super excited about it, and felt very inspired when the idea came to me last week.

I’ve never written a book before, but I’ve wanted to for a few years. I just never knew what to write it on. I’m looking forward to the process, learning a heckuva lot, and seeing the final product in print.

If you agree with me that this project needs to happen, please consider supporting me financially. Every little bit helps.

Like this story?

By Kim Siever

I live in Lethbridge with my spouse and 5 of our 6 children. I’m a writer, focusing on social issues and the occasional poem. My politics are radically left. I recently finished writing a book debunking several capitalism myths. My newest book writing project is on the labour history of Lethbridge.

I’m also dichotomally Mormon. And I’m a functional vegetarian: I have a blog post about that somewhere around here. My pronouns are he/him.

5 replies on “I’m writing a book on Lethbridge’s labour history”

In my opinion, Unions have become as corrupt as the employers they originally were formed to fight. Unions now have procured exorbitantly high wages, too much overtime, sick days etc., especially if it is government. Unions are now shoving thier power around, and have us paying up to 20% more than other jurisdictions across Canada. When my Grandpa was a coal miner in the early 1900’s, Unions were the only way the miners were going to get fair wages, hours, working environment, etc. Now, it is ridiculous how they have bogged up employers about starting wages, yearly increases for every year served, job descriptions where you can never do someone else’s job, and the list goes on. Unions must be reined in, they’re destructive now.

As long as the top 100 CEOs in Canada make as much in one weekday morning as the average worker makes in an entire year, I will never be convinced that unions are obsolete. As long as public corporations make billions of dollars in profits—money that rightly belongs to the workers whose labour produced that profit—I will never be convinced that unions are obsolete.
Corporations and billionaires are the ones who need reining in.

The only real problem with unions in Canada, in my opinion, is how small they are. Every worker should be unionized, that would reign everyone in and help labour find a balance with industry so that all permanent jobs include benefits and pensions and wages are in line with the cost of living.

Comment on this story

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.